Old Manse

The next stop after the North Bridge was the Old Manse which is close to the bridge and the Concord River.  This house was erected by Rev. William Emerson in 1770.  William was the grandfather to Ralph Waldo Emerson, a famous Transcendentalist speaker and writer.  

 
The Old Manse is a beautiful Georgian clapboard building.  Along the border of the field is a stone wall that dates back centuries.  The North Bridge can be seen from the upstairs. 

This place played a role in a different type of revolution.  It became the place for prominent Transcendentalists to meet to discuss literary, political and social revolutions.  This included Bronson Alcott, Margaret Fuller, and Henry David Thoreau. 
 
In 1834 Emerson lived in the house and he drafted his landmark essay “Nature.” 
 
Nathaniel Hawthorne and his wife Sophia Peabody rented the Old Manse in 1842.  One of their friends, Henry David Thoreau planted a vegetable garden for them.  They lived in the home for three years and during this time he completed most of the stories in Mosses from an Old Manse.  They left the home when they could not pay the rent.
 
In 1966 the home was designated a National Historic Landmark and a Massachusetts Archaeological/Historic Landmark. 

Back of the house:

Above is a photo of the stone wall.

Below are views of the boat house by the Concord River:

Up next: The Sleepy Hollow Cemetary

About TBM

TB Markinson is an American living in England. When she isn’t writing, she’s traveling the world, watching sports on the telly, visiting pubs, or reading. Not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Books, Nature, North America, Travel, Travel Photos, United States, Writers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Old Manse

  1. I love your photos of the Boston area. I lived nearby when I was younger but never got to see these historic and beautiful places. Thanks so much for sharing them.

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